Vegetation Fires and Biomass Burning in Asia

A special issue of Fire (ISSN 2571-6255). This special issue belongs to the section "Fire Research at the Science–Policy–Practitioner Interface".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2024 | Viewed by 5523

Special Issue Editor


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Geosciences and Civil Engineering, Institute of Science and Engineering, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa 920-1192, Japan
Interests: aerosol; air pollution; biomass burning; carbon; emission inventory; forest fires; health risks; particulate matter; remote sensing; wildfire hazard
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

I am pleased to invite you to submit a manuscript to the Special Issue titled “Vegetation Fires and Biomass Burning in Asia” in the journal Fire.

In Asia, biomass open burning is one of the primary sources of particulate matter (PM) and gaseous pollutants that are emitted into the atmosphere, mainly from forest fires in mainland Asia. During the dry season, open biomass burning is an annual occurrence in Asia, and only limited information is available for the spao-temporal variation of wildfires. Moreover, the rapid development of economics in Asia increases air pollution from forest areas that are related to the agricultural sector.

Therefore, this Special Issue aims to present advances in the studies of the burning of biomass, including forest fires, crop residue burning and grassland fires. The impacts of biomass burning on air quality and the burning of biomass for fuel will be modeled, and biomass combustion, biomass for energy and hazard assessment simulated.

In this Special Issue, original contributions as research articles, review manuscripts and short communications are welcome.

I look forward to receiving your contributions.

Dr. Worradorn Phairuang
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Fire is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • agricultural residue burning
  • air monitoring
  • air pollution
  • biomass burning
  • emission inventory
  • forest fires
  • health risks
  • particulate matter
  • remote sensing
  • wildfire hazard

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

26 pages, 8697 KiB  
Article
The Spatial–Temporal Emission of Air Pollutants from Biomass Burning during Haze Episodes in Northern Thailand
by Phakphum Paluang, Watinee Thavorntam and Worradorn Phairuang
Fire 2024, 7(4), 122; https://doi.org/10.3390/fire7040122 - 08 Apr 2024
Viewed by 395
Abstract
Air pollutants from biomass burning, including forest fires and agricultural trash burning, have contributed significantly to the pollution of the Asian atmosphere. Burned area estimates are variable, making it difficult to measure these emissions. Improving emission quantification of these critical air pollution sources [...] Read more.
Air pollutants from biomass burning, including forest fires and agricultural trash burning, have contributed significantly to the pollution of the Asian atmosphere. Burned area estimates are variable, making it difficult to measure these emissions. Improving emission quantification of these critical air pollution sources requires refining methods and collecting thorough data. This study estimates air pollutants from biomass burning, including PMs, NOX, SO2, BC, and OC. Machine learning (ML) with the Random Forest (RF) method was used to assess burned areas in Google Earth Engine. Forest emissions were highest in the upper north and peaked in March and April 2019. Air pollutants from agricultural waste residue were found in the lower north, but harvesting seasons made timing less reliable. Biomass burning was compared to the MODIS aerosol optical depth (AOD) and Sentinel-5P air pollutants, with all comparisons made by the Pollution Control Department (PCD) Thailand air monitoring stations. Agro-industries, mainly sugar factories, produce air pollutants by burning bagasse as biomass fuel. Meanwhile, the emission inventory of agricultural operations in northern Thailand, including that of agro-industry and forest fires, was found to have a good relationship with the monthly average levels of ambient air pollutants. Overall, the information uncovered in this study is vital for air quality control and mitigation in northern Thailand and elsewhere. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Vegetation Fires and Biomass Burning in Asia)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Full article ">Full article ">Full article ">Full article ">Full article ">Full article ">Full article ">Full article ">Full article ">Full article ">Full article ">Full article ">Full article ">Full article ">
17 pages, 4337 KiB  
Article
Fire as a Factor in the Dynamics of Meadow Vegetation: A Model Experiment in Western Siberia
by Sergey Lednev, Denis Kasymov, Ivan Semenkov, Galya Klink, Mikhail Agafontsev and Tatyana Koroleva
Fire 2024, 7(4), 115; https://doi.org/10.3390/fire7040115 - 02 Apr 2024
Viewed by 643
Abstract
The state of meadow vegetation in areas with different ages of experimental spring burnout (from 1 to 12 years ago) was studied in the Tomsk region for 3 years. On experimental plots of 1 m2 and 100 m2 (small- and middle-scale [...] Read more.
The state of meadow vegetation in areas with different ages of experimental spring burnout (from 1 to 12 years ago) was studied in the Tomsk region for 3 years. On experimental plots of 1 m2 and 100 m2 (small- and middle-scale levels, respectively), the dynamics of species richness, total projective cover of vegetation, and aboveground phytomass reserves were characterized, and the structure of communities was analyzed. It was revealed that a single fire in the spring significantly reduces species richness for small-scale plots and increases the total projective cover for middle-scale plots. Structural differences from control plots can be traced from 1 to 4 years for different characteristics. The effects of fire are more prominent for small-scale plots. To suppress tree growth and maintain the existence of meadows, grass fires seem to be a less effective practice than mowing. At the same time, the results obtained potentially allow us to consider prescribed burning as a tool for maintaining the stability of meadow plant communities in the south of Western Siberia, preventing them from becoming overgrown with tree undergrowth, in cases with a controlled frequency of burning and the use of appropriate fire safety measures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Vegetation Fires and Biomass Burning in Asia)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Full article ">Full article ">Full article ">Full article ">Full article ">Full article ">Full article ">
11 pages, 7163 KiB  
Article
Assessing the Fire-Modified Meteorology of the Grassland and Forest Intersection Zone in Mongolia Using the WRF-Fire Model
by Yongli Wang, Lamei Shi, Zitong Shi, Qichao Yao, Zhou Wang and Linhao Zhong
Fire 2023, 6(11), 443; https://doi.org/10.3390/fire6110443 - 18 Nov 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1647
Abstract
Climate change is already significantly affecting the frequency of wildfires in most regions of the world, and the risk of wildfires is expected to amplify further with global warming. Accordingly, there is growing concern about the mechanisms and impacts of extreme fires. In [...] Read more.
Climate change is already significantly affecting the frequency of wildfires in most regions of the world, and the risk of wildfires is expected to amplify further with global warming. Accordingly, there is growing concern about the mechanisms and impacts of extreme fires. In this study, a coupling of the Weather Research and Forecasting model and the Rothermel Fire model (WRF-Fire) is employed to reproduce the spread of fire within the national boundary of inner Mongolia from 21 to 27 May 2009. Simulations were run with or without feedback from fire-to-atmosphere models, and the study focused on how the energy flux of simulated fires changes the local meteorological environment. The coupled simulation could reproduce the burned area well, and the wind speed was the dominant factor in the fire spread, with a maximum value no more than 6.4 m/s, when the terrain height changes little and the proportion of grassland is low. After the feedback, the propagation speed of the fire accelerated, accompanying the release of latent and sensible heat, and local circulation formed near the front of the fire, leading to a convergence and divergence zone in the downwind area. It is worth noting that during a period of more than 140 h of simulation, the area of the fire field increased by 17% from ignition time. Therefore, considering the fire–atmosphere interaction is necessary for accurately predicting fire behavior. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Vegetation Fires and Biomass Burning in Asia)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Full article ">Full article ">Full article ">Full article ">Full article ">Full article ">Full article ">
17 pages, 6732 KiB  
Article
Assessment of Burn Severity and Monitoring of the Wildfire Recovery Process in Mongolia
by Battsengel Vandansambuu, Byambakhuu Gantumur, Falin Wu, Oyunsanaa Byambasuren, Sainbuyan Bayarsaikhan, Narantsetseg Chantsal, Nyamdavaa Batsaikhan, Yuhai Bao, Batbayar Vandansambuu and Munkh-Erdene Jimseekhuu
Fire 2023, 6(10), 373; https://doi.org/10.3390/fire6100373 - 26 Sep 2023
Viewed by 2053
Abstract
Due to the intensification of climate change around the world, the incidence of natural disasters is increasing year by year, and monitoring, forecasting, and detecting evolution using satellite imaging technology are important methods for remote sensing. This study aimed to monitor the occurrence [...] Read more.
Due to the intensification of climate change around the world, the incidence of natural disasters is increasing year by year, and monitoring, forecasting, and detecting evolution using satellite imaging technology are important methods for remote sensing. This study aimed to monitor the occurrence of fire disasters using Sentinel-2 satellite imaging technology to determine the burned-severity area via classification and to study the recovery process to observe extraordinary natural phenomena. The study area that was sampled was in the southeastern part of Mongolia, where most wildfires occur each year, near the Shiliin Bogd Mountain in the natural steppe zone and in the Bayan-Uul sub-province in the forest-steppe natural zone. The normalized burn ratio (NBR) method was used to map the area of the fire site and determine the classification of the burned area. The Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) was used to determine the recovery process in a timely series in the summer from April to October. The results of the burn severity were demonstrated in the distribution maps from the satellite images, where it can be seen that the total burned area of the steppe natural zone was 1164.27 km2, of which 757.34 km2 (65.00 percent) was classified as low, 404.57 km2 (34.70 percent) was moderate-low, and the remaining 2.36 km2 (0.30 percent) was moderate-high, and the total burned area of the forest-steppe natural zone was 588.35 km2, of which 158.75 km2 (26.98 percent) was classified as low, 297.75 km2 (50.61 percent) was moderate-low, 131.25 km2 (22.31 percent) was moderate-high, and the remaining 0.60 km2 (0.10 percent) was high. Finally, we believe that this research is most helpful for emergency workers, researchers, and environmental specialists. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Vegetation Fires and Biomass Burning in Asia)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Full article ">Full article ">Full article ">Full article ">Full article ">Full article ">Full article ">Full article ">Full article ">Full article ">Full article ">
Back to TopTop
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news